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Coupling of cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity is decreased in healthy aging.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Coupling of cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity is decreased in healthy aging.

Brain Imaging Behav. 2019 Jun 27;:

Authors: Galiano A, Mengual E, García de Eulate R, Galdeano I, Vidorreta M, Recio M, Riverol M, Zubieta JL, Fernández-Seara MA

Abstract
Aging leads to cerebral perfusion and functional connectivity changes that have been assessed using various neuroimaging techniques. In addition, a link between these two parameters has been demonstrated in healthy young adults. In this work, we employed arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure global and voxel-wise differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC) in the resting state in a group of cognitively normal elderly subjects and a group of cognitively normal young subjects, in order to assess the effects of aging on CBF-ICC coupling, which had not been previously evaluated. Our results showed age-related global and regional CBF decreases in prefrontal mesial areas, lateral frontal regions, insular cortex, lateral parietal areas, precuneus and occipital regions. Subcortically, perfusion was reduced in the medial thalamus and caudate nucleus. ICC was also found reduced with age in prefrontal cortical areas and insular cortex, affecting key nodes of the default mode and salience networks. Areas of ICC and CBF decrease partially overlapped, however, the CBF reduction was more extensive and encompassed more areas. This dissociation was accompanied by a decrease in CBF-ICC coupling. These results suggest that aging leads to a disruption in the relationship between CBF and intrinsic functional connectivity that could be due to neurovascular dysregulation.

PMID: 31250268 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Association of LHPP genetic variation (rs35936514) with structural and functional connectivity of hippocampal-corticolimbic neural circuitry.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Association of LHPP genetic variation (rs35936514) with structural and functional connectivity of hippocampal-corticolimbic neural circuitry.

Brain Imaging Behav. 2019 Jun 27;:

Authors: Cui L, Gong X, Chang M, Yin Z, Geng H, Song Y, Lv J, Feng R, Wang F, Tang Y, Xu K

Abstract
A single nucleotide polymorphism at the LHPP gene (rs35936514) has been reported to be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) in genome-wide association studies. We conducted a neuroimaging analysis to explore whether and which brain neural systems are affected by LHPP variation. Since LHPP variants seem to be associated with the hippocampus, we assessed the relationship between rs35936514 variation and structural-functional connectivity within a hippocampal-corticolimbic neural system implicated in MDD. A total of 122 Chinese subjects were divided into a CC homozygous group (CC genotype, n = 60) and a T allele-carrier group (CT/TT genotypes, n = 62). All subjects participated in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans. Structural and functional connectivity data analyses were then performed. Compared to the CC group, the T allele-carrier group showed significantly higher fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the fornix as well as increased functional connectivity from the hippocampus to the rostral part of the anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). Moreover, a significant negative correlation between fornix FA value and hippocampus-rACC functional connectivity was identified (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that there is a relationship between rs35936514 variation and both structural and functional hippocampal-corticolimbic neural system involvement in MDD. LHPP may play an important role in the neuropathophysiology of MDD.

PMID: 31250265 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Intrinsic functional connectivity of medial prefrontal cortex predicts the individual moral bias in economic valuation partially through the moral sensitivity trait.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Intrinsic functional connectivity of medial prefrontal cortex predicts the individual moral bias in economic valuation partially through the moral sensitivity trait.

Brain Imaging Behav. 2019 Jun 27;:

Authors: Liu J, Yuan B, Luo YJ, Cui F

Abstract
An individual's economic valuation of a given object is biased by the moral status of the persons to whom the object is attached. The neural basis for how such "moral bias" occurs, especially how it is maintained in the resting state, are largely unknown. In the current study, we explored this question by correlating the functional connectivity with participants' behavioral performance measured in a novel task which captured how the economic valuation was influenced by given moral information. Seed-based FC analysis showed that the functional connectivity between the mPFC and the orbital mPFC (omPFC), the mPFC and the precuneus, the mPFC and the left anterior cingulum, were significantly associated with the behavioral index of morality effect on economic valuation. Multivariate machine learning-based regression analysis showed that connections in the mPFC network, as well as in the putamen network could well predict the behavior performance, indicating that this mPFC network and the putamen network were crucial for this moral bias. Our results further revealed that the individuals' personal trait of moral sensitivity served as a mediator between the rsFC of mPFC network and the behavioral index of morality effect on economic valuation.

PMID: 31250264 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Reduced Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Reduced Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients.

Front Psychiatry. 2019;10:418

Authors: Deng K, Qi T, Xu J, Jiang L, Zhang F, Dai N, Cheng Y, Xu X

Abstract
Background: Neuroimaging studies have shown that the high synchrony of spontaneous neural activity in the homotopic regions between hemispheres is an important functional structural feature of normal human brains, and this feature is abnormal in the patients with various mental disorders. However, little is known about this feature in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study aimed to further analyze the underlying neural mechanisms of OCD and to explore whether clinical characteristics are correlated with the alerted homotopic connectivity in patients with OCD. Methods: Using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) during resting state, we compared 46 OCD patients and 46 healthy controls (HCs) matched for age, gender, and education level. A partial correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between altered VMHC and clinical characteristics in patients with OCD. Results: Patients with OCD showed lower VMHC than HCs in fusiform gyrus/inferior occipital gyrus, lingual gyrus, postcentral gyrus/precentral gyrus, putamen, and orbital frontal gyrus. A significant positive correlation was observed between altered VMHC in the angular gyrus/middle occipital gyrus and illness duration in patients. Conclusions: Interhemispheric functional imbalance may be an essential aspect of the pathophysiological mechanism of OCD, which is reflected not only in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) loop but also elsewhere in the brain.

PMID: 31249539 [PubMed]

Localized Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Investigation Combining Univariate and Multivariate Pattern Analyses.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Localized Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Investigation Combining Univariate and Multivariate Pattern Analyses.

Front Behav Neurosci. 2019;13:122

Authors: Hu X, Zhang L, Bu X, Li H, Li B, Tang W, Lu L, Hu X, Tang S, Gao Y, Yang Y, Roberts N, Gong Q, Huang X

Abstract
Recent developments in psychoradiological researches have highlighted the disrupted organization of large-scale functional brain networks in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, whether abnormal activation of localized brain areas would affect network dysfunction remains to be fully characterized. We applied both univariate analysis and multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) approaches to investigate the abnormalities of regional homogeneity (ReHo), an index to measure the localized connectivity, in 88 medication-free patients with OCD and 88 healthy control subjects (HCS). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) data of all the participants were acquired in a 3.0-T scanner. First, we adopted a traditional univariate analysis to explore ReHo alterations between the patient group and the control group. Subsequently, we utilized a support vector machine (SVM) to examine whether ReHo could be further used to differentiate patients with OCD from HCS at the individual level. Relative to HCS, OCD patients showed lower ReHo in the bilateral cerebellum and higher ReHo in the bilateral superior frontal gyri (SFG), right inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and precuneus [P < 0.05, family-wise error (FWE) correction]. ReHo value in the left SFG positively correlated with Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) total score (r = 0 0.241, P = 0.024) and obsessive subscale (r = 0.224, P = 0.036). The SVM classification regarding ReHo yielded an accuracy of 78.98% (sensitivity = 78.41%, specificity = 79.55%) with P < 0.001 after permutation testing. The most discriminative regions contributing to the SVM classification were mainly located in the frontal, temporal, and parietal regions as well as in the cerebellum while the right orbital frontal cortex was identified with the highest discriminative power. Our findings not only suggested that the localized activation disequilibrium between the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the cerebellum appeared to be associated with the pathophysiology of OCD but also indicated the translational role of the localized connectivity as a potential discriminative pattern to detect OCD at the individual level.

PMID: 31249515 [PubMed]

Application of Graph Theory for Identifying Connectivity Patterns in Human Brain Networks: A Systematic Review.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Application of Graph Theory for Identifying Connectivity Patterns in Human Brain Networks: A Systematic Review.

Front Neurosci. 2019;13:585

Authors: Farahani FV, Karwowski W, Lighthall NR

Abstract
Background: Analysis of the human connectome using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) started in the mid-1990s and attracted increasing attention in attempts to discover the neural underpinnings of human cognition and neurological disorders. In general, brain connectivity patterns from fMRI data are classified as statistical dependencies (functional connectivity) or causal interactions (effective connectivity) among various neural units. Computational methods, especially graph theory-based methods, have recently played a significant role in understanding brain connectivity architecture. Objectives: Thanks to the emergence of graph theoretical analysis, the main purpose of the current paper is to systematically review how brain properties can emerge through the interactions of distinct neuronal units in various cognitive and neurological applications using fMRI. Moreover, this article provides an overview of the existing functional and effective connectivity methods used to construct the brain network, along with their advantages and pitfalls. Methods: In this systematic review, the databases Science Direct, Scopus, arXiv, Google Scholar, IEEE Xplore, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SpringerLink are employed for exploring the evolution of computational methods in human brain connectivity from 1990 to the present, focusing on graph theory. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool was used to assess the risk of bias in individual studies. Results: Our results show that graph theory and its implications in cognitive neuroscience have attracted the attention of researchers since 2009 (as the Human Connectome Project launched), because of their prominent capability in characterizing the behavior of complex brain systems. Although graph theoretical approach can be generally applied to either functional or effective connectivity patterns during rest or task performance, to date, most articles have focused on the resting-state functional connectivity. Conclusions: This review provides an insight into how to utilize graph theoretical measures to make neurobiological inferences regarding the mechanisms underlying human cognition and behavior as well as different brain disorders.

PMID: 31249501 [PubMed]

Sequential replay of nonspatial task states in the human hippocampus.

Sun, 06/30/2019 - 21:13
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Sequential replay of nonspatial task states in the human hippocampus.

Science. 2019 06 28;364(6447):

Authors: Schuck NW, Niv Y

Abstract
Sequential neural activity patterns related to spatial experiences are "replayed" in the hippocampus of rodents during rest. We investigated whether replay of nonspatial sequences can be detected noninvasively in the human hippocampus. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while resting after performing a decision-making task with sequential structure. Hippocampal fMRI patterns recorded at rest reflected sequentiality of previously experienced task states, with consecutive patterns corresponding to nearby states. Hippocampal sequentiality correlated with the fidelity of task representations recorded in the orbitofrontal cortex during decision-making, which were themselves related to better task performance. Our findings suggest that hippocampal replay may be important for building representations of complex, abstract tasks elsewhere in the brain and establish feasibility of investigating fast replay signals with fMRI.

PMID: 31249030 [PubMed - in process]

Aberrant topological organization of the default mode network in temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by graph-theoretical analysis.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08

Aberrant topological organization of the default mode network in temporal lobe epilepsy revealed by graph-theoretical analysis.

Neurosci Lett. 2019 Jun 24;:134351

Authors: Zhou X, Zhang Z, Liu J, Qin L, Zheng J

Abstract
Numerous neuroimaging studies have reported aberrant functional activities of the default mode network (DMN) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, the alteration on topological organization within the DMN has not been clearly illuminated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the topological abnormalities within the DMN from a larger-scale perspective. Twenty three patients with TLE and 23 age, gender, and education matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scanning and completed the Attention Network Test (ANT) for executive function assessment. Specific subregions in the DMN were extracted for network construction according to the automated anatomical labelling atlas. Network properties, including global properties, nodal properties and edge analyses, were assessed using graph theory. Correlation analyses were performed between significantly different topological properties and clinical factors in patients. The ANT tests showed that executive function was impaired in the patients with TLE compared with the HCs. Furthermore, the TLE group showed decreased nodal strength in the left medial orbital superior frontal gyrus and increased nodal strength in the right inferior parietal gyrus in the DMN. Significantly increased functional connectivities between subregions in the DMN were primarily located in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, precuneus, and posterior cingulate gyrus. Moreover, the degree centrality of the right inferior parietal gyrus was positively correlated with disease duration. In conclusion, this study indicated that there existed a disrupted topological reorganization within the DMN in patients with TLE, which may further contribute to executive deficits and, to some extent, play a compensatory role.

PMID: 31247225 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Volume of Hypothalamus as a Diagnostic Biomarker of Chronic Migraine.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08

Volume of Hypothalamus as a Diagnostic Biomarker of Chronic Migraine.

Front Neurol. 2019;10:606

Authors: Chen Z, Chen X, Liu M, Ma L, Yu S

Abstract
It is believed than hypothalamus (HTH) might be involved in generation of migraine, and evidence from high resolution fMRI reported that the more anterior part of HTH seemed to play an important role in migraine chronification. The current study was aimed to identify the alteration of morphology and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of the hypothalamus (HTH) in interictal episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM). High-resolution structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 18 EM patients, 16 CM patients, and 21 normal controls (NC). The volume of HTH was calculated and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed over the whole HTH. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was applied to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of HTH volume. Correlation analyses with clinical variables were performed and FC maps were generated for positive HTH regions according to VBM comparison. The volume of the HTH significantly decreased in both EM and CM patients compared with NC. The cut-off volume of HTH as 1.429 ml had a good diagnostic accuracy for CM with sensitivity of 81.25% and specificity of 100%. VBM analyses identified volume reduction of posterior HTH in EM vs. NC which was negatively correlated with headache frequency. The posterior HTH presented decreased FC with the left inferior temporal gyrus (Brodmann area 20) in EM. Decreased volume of anterior HTH was identified in CM vs. NC and CM vs. EM which was positively correlated with headache frequency in CM. The anterior HTH presented increased FC with the right anterior orbital gyrus (AOrG) (Brodmann area 11) in CM compared with NC and increased FC with the right medial orbital gyrus (MOrG) (Brodmann area 11) in CM compared with EM. Our study provided evidence of structural plasticity and FC changes of HTH in the pathogensis of migraine generation and chronification, supporting potential therapeutic target toward the HTH and its peptide.

PMID: 31244765 [PubMed]

Functional Correlates of Resting-State Connectivity in the Default Mode Network of Heroin Users on Methadone Treatment and Medication-Free Therapeutic Community Program.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08

Functional Correlates of Resting-State Connectivity in the Default Mode Network of Heroin Users on Methadone Treatment and Medication-Free Therapeutic Community Program.

Front Psychiatry. 2019;10:381

Authors: Kuo LW, Lin PS, Lin SY, Liu MF, Jan H, Lee HC, Wang SC

Abstract
The treatment of heroin addiction is a complex process involving changes in addictive behavior and brain functioning. The goal of this study was to explore the brain default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and decision-making performance based on the Cambridge gambling task in heroin-dependent individuals undergoing methadone treatment (MT, n = 11) and medication-free faith-based therapeutic community program (TC, n = 11). The DMN involved the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), left inferior parietal lobe (IPLL), right inferior parietal lobe (IPLR), and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) subregions for all participants in both the MT and TC groups. Compared with MT, TC had an increased functional connectivity in IPLL-IPLR and IPLR-PCC and decreased functional connectivity in mPFC-IPLL and IPLL-PCC. Both groups exhibited no significant difference in the regional rs-fMRI metric [i.e., amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)]. In the analysis of the neural correlates for decision-making performance, risk adjustment was positively associated with ALFF in IPLL for all participants considering the group effects. The involvement of IPL in decision-making performance and treatment response among heroin-dependent patients warrants further investigation.

PMID: 31244690 [PubMed]

Connectome-Based Biomarkers Predict Subclinical Depression and Identify Abnormal Brain Connections With the Lateral Habenula and Thalamus.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08

Connectome-Based Biomarkers Predict Subclinical Depression and Identify Abnormal Brain Connections With the Lateral Habenula and Thalamus.

Front Psychiatry. 2019;10:371

Authors: Zhu Y, Qi S, Zhang B, He D, Teng Y, Hu J, Wei X

Abstract
Subclinical depression (SD) has been considered as the precursor to major depressive disorder. Accurate prediction of SD and identification of its etiological origin are urgent. Bursts within the lateral habenula (LHb) drive depression in rats, but whether dysfunctional LHb is associated with SD in human is unknown. Here we develop connectome-based biomarkers which predict SD and identify dysfunctional brain regions and connections. T1 weighted images and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data were collected from 34 subjects with SD and 40 healthy controls (HCs). After the brain is parcellated into 48 brain regions (246 subregions) using the human Brainnetome Atlas, the functional network of each participant is constructed by calculating the correlation coefficient for the time series of fMRI signals of each pair of subregions. Initial candidates of abnormal connections are identified by the two-sample t-test and input into Support Vector Machine models as features. A total of 24 anatomical-region-based models, 231 sliding-window-based models, and 100 random-selection-based models are built. The performance of these models is estimated through leave-one-out cross-validation and evaluated by measures of accuracy, sensitivity, confusion matrix, receiver operating characteristic curve, and the area under the curve (AUC). After confirming the region with the highest accuracy, subregions within the thalamus and connections associated with subregions of LHb are compared. It is found that five prediction models using connections of the thalamus, posterior superior temporal sulcus, cingulate gyrus, superior parietal lobule, and superior frontal gyrus achieve an accuracy >0.9 and an AUC >0.93. Among 90 abnormal connections associated with the thalamus, the subregion of the right posterior parietal thalamus where LHb is located has the most connections (n = 18), the left subregion only has 3 connections. In SD group, 10 subregions in the thalamus have significantly different node degrees with those in the HC group, while 8 subregions have lower degrees ( p < 0.01), including the one with LHb. These results implicate abnormal brain connections associated with the thalamus and LHb to be associated with SD. Integration of these connections by machine learning can provide connectome-based biomarkers to accurately diagnose SD.

PMID: 31244688 [PubMed]

Exploring the Neural Correlates in Adopting a Realistic View: A Neural Structural and Functional Connectivity Study With Female Nurses.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08

Exploring the Neural Correlates in Adopting a Realistic View: A Neural Structural and Functional Connectivity Study With Female Nurses.

Front Hum Neurosci. 2019;13:197

Authors: Ogino Y, Kawamichi H, Kakeda T, Saito S

Abstract
Empathizing leads to positive and negative consequences. To avoid empathy-induced distress, adopting a realistic view (dealing with a situation practically and efficiently independent of one's emotional state) is important. We hypothesized that empathy-demanding professions (e.g., nursing) may require individuals to adopt a realistic view, which may demonstrate modulated neural structure and functional connectivity. We confirmed that female nurses showed a higher tendency, compared to controls, to adopt a realistic view, using the Fantasy subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI; inverse scale of the realistic view). We then employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to explore the neural underpinnings related to realistic view adoption. Nurses exhibited significantly lower gray-matter volume (GMV) in the right striatum. In multiple regression analysis, only the Fantasy subscale score showed a significant positive correlation with GMV within the striatum cluster. Moreover, nurses exhibited lower functional connectivity between the right striatum and the right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), representing emotional regulation. These findings show that structural differences in the striatum correlated with the realistic view. Furthermore, lower functional connectivity between the striatum and lateral PFC suggests that nurses may use efficient coping strategies that may lessen the recruitment of effortful emotional regulation.

PMID: 31244632 [PubMed]

SNCA rs11931074 polymorphism correlates with spontaneous brain activity and motor symptoms in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease.

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 18:08
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SNCA rs11931074 polymorphism correlates with spontaneous brain activity and motor symptoms in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease.

J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2019 Jun 26;:

Authors: Si QQ, Yuan YS, Zhi Y, Wang M, Wang JW, Shen YT, Wang LN, Li JY, Wang XX, Zhang KZ

Abstract
The α-synuclein (SNCA) gene is thought to be involved in levels of α-synuclein and influence the susceptibility for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study is to explore the association among SNCA rs1193074 polymorphism, spontaneous brain activity and clinical symptoms in PD patients. 62 PD patients and 47 healthy controls (HC) were recruited and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scans. Also blood sample of each participant was genotyped for rs11931074 polymorphism (PD: TT = 19, GT = 32, GG = 11; HC: TT = 10, GT = 25, GG = 12) and then examined to ascertain the influence of different genotypes on regional brain activity with amplitude low-frequency fluctuation analysis (ALFF). Furthermore, we evaluated the relationship among genotypes, interactive brain region and clinical symptoms in PD. Compared with HC subjects, PD patients showed decreased ALFF values in right lingual gyrus and increased ALFF values in right cerebellum posterior lobe. Significant interaction of ''groups × genotypes'' was found in the right angular gyrus, where there were higher ALFF values in TT genotype than in GT or GG genotype in the PD group and there was a contrary trend in the HC group. And further Spearman's correlative analyses revealed that ALFF values in right angular gyrus were negatively associated with unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) III score in PD-TT genotype. Our study shows for the first time that SNCA rs11931074 polymorphism might modulate brain functional alterations and correlate with motor symptoms in Chinese PD patients.

PMID: 31243602 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Left frontal connectivity attenuates the adverse effect of entorhinal tau pathology on memory.

Thu, 06/27/2019 - 21:06
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Left frontal connectivity attenuates the adverse effect of entorhinal tau pathology on memory.

Neurology. 2019 Jun 24;:

Authors: Neitzel J, Franzmeier N, Rubinski A, Ewers M, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether higher global left frontal cortex (gLFC) connectivity, a putative neural substrate of cognitive reserve, attenuates the effect of entorhinal tau PET levels on episodic memory in older adults.
METHODS: Cross-sectional 18F-AV-1451 PET (to assess tau pathology), 18F-AV-45 or 18F-BAY94-9172 PET (to assess β-amyloid [Aβ]), and resting-state fMRI were obtained in 125 elderly participants from the Alzheimer's Neuroimaging Initiative, including 82 cognitively normal participants (amyloid PET-positive [Aβ+], n = 27) and 43 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (Aβ+ = 15). Resting-state fMRI gLFC connectivity was computed for each participant as the average functional connectivity between the left frontal cortex (LFC) (seed) and each remaining voxel in the gray matter. As a measure of tau pathology, we assessed the mean tau PET uptake in the entorhinal cortex. In linear mixed-effects regression analysis, we tested the interaction term gLFC connectivity × entorhinal tau PET on delayed free recall performance. In addition, we assessed whether higher connectivity of the whole frontoparietal control network (FPCN), of which the LFC is a major hub, is associated with reserve.
RESULTS: Higher entorhinal tau PET was strongly associated with poorer delayed free recall performance (β/SE = -0.49/0.07, p < 0.001). A significant gLFC connectivity × entorhinal tau PET interaction was found (β/SE = 0.19/0.06, p = 0.003), such that at higher levels of gLFC connectivity, the decrease in memory score per unit of entorhinal tau PET was attenuated. The FPCN connectivity × tau interaction was also significant (β/SE = 0.10/0.04, p = 0.012).
CONCLUSION: Both gLFC and FPCN connectivity are associated with higher resilience against the adverse effect of early-stage entorhinal tau pathology on memory performance.

PMID: 31235661 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]